Can You Play Audio Through AUX and Bluetooth at the Same Time?

Written by Jonah Matthes
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Sometimes you might want to listen to the same music through auxiliary speakers and your Bluetooth device at the same time. Unfortunately, it’s not as simple as pressing the play button on both devices. Chances are if you’ve tried it, the sound is only emitted from one or the other. So, is it even possible to sync AUX and Bluetooth?

Most devices won’t let you use the auxiliary output and Bluetooth simultaneously, however, if you add an auxiliary splitter and Bluetooth adapter you can listen to the same music through both channels. There are other devices you may need to learn about as well.

Put simply, it is possible to play audio through both aux and Bluetooth at the same time, however, you'll need another component or a device like a male-to-female dual auxiliary splitter (from Amazon). If you’re not sure why you need to do this or need some tips on setting it up, you’ll find the information you need in the following paragraphs, including why some people would even want to use both channels in the first place.

Why Would You Want to Use Both AUX and Bluetooth?

There are times when using Aux and Bluetooth together is convenient. You might want to share the music you’re listening to with friends via your PC or Mac. There are also times when you want to output the audio to wired headphones to Bluetooth enabled ones. Or send the audio from a wired speaker to a Bluetooth connected one.

For example, your Bluetooth enables mobile devices might contain your playlist and you want to listen to the music on your home speakers. Or someone in the home could prefer headphones to speakers. Audio often sounds better through speakers than mobile devices, which is why we have a guide on connecting Bluetooth speakers to mobile devices, but not all components are designed to play audio at the same time.

Most Devices Can't Natively Use AUX and Bluetooth at the Same Time

Apple iPhone Bottom Ports - Smaller

Even though, the Bluetooth Special Interest Group states that it’s the most commonly used global wireless technology, it doesn’t mean that it’s compatible with all devices, additionally, older versions of Bluetooth means limited capabilities which were explored in our article on whether Bluetooth can be used to connect one device to more than one speaker. Your auxiliary speakers often can’t communicate with Bluetooth devices.

If this is the case, you won't be able to listen to audio through aux and Bluetooth at the same time. The reason for the issue with device communication often comes down to the hardware and software Bluetooth depends on to function. The device you are trying to use with Bluetooth must speak the same ‘language’. Even if there is a communication problem between the devices you want to use, there is still a solution.

How to Use AUX and Bluetooth at the Same Time with Any Device

There are a few components you’ll need to use aux and Bluetooth at the same time, regardless of the device. The first is a device with an auxiliary output. It can be anything from wired speakers or headphones. You will also need a Bluetooth transmitter, such as this one from Amazon, and your options are almost unlimited. It can be a handheld device, speakers, or headphones.

You will also need a male to a dual female auxiliary splitter. It’s a small component that you can pick up online or at an electronics store. It’s not expensive, and you'll definitely need it if you want simultaneous audio from both aux and Bluetooth.

Connect the AUX Splitter to the Source Device

Also known as a “y” splitter, it allows you to divide an audio signal between two devices, and it’s not difficult to install. It typically comes with two 3.5mm outputs that allow you to connect speakers or headphones to the jack your device is connected to. The splitter typically sits between the two devices so the cables connect. You might have to rearrange some components.

Connect the AUX Device to One End of the Splitter

On the splitter that should be within cable reach of the devices, you want to connect your auxiliary device to one end of the splitter. Like most connectors, there are at least two ports, one of these is for your auxiliary device. You’ll plug your aux speakers into the splitter so the signal is divided between the two connected components.

If you’re worried about losing audio quality, it usually isn’t an issue. Distortion also isn’t a typical problem since the connecting cables and splitter are close. Interference and reduce audio quality often only occur when two cables for the same device are connected together over long distances. If all of the devices are kept within a single cable’s length, audio should sound crisp and clear.

Connect the Bluetooth Transmitter to the Other End of the Splitter

On the end opposite of where you connected the aux device, you want to attach the Bluetooth transmitter. You shouldn’t have any problems because the cable is designed to be plugged in smoothly. Once the cable is connected to the splitter, there is one more step which is to pair the Bluetooth transmitter with the auxiliary device.

Your Bluetooth transmitter is the Bluetooth enabled device that you want to play audio simultaneously with an aux one. It’s easy to sync the two devices, your Bluetooth-enabled one should walk you through the on-screen steps if it’s a PC or Mac. If you're connecting wired speakers or headphones, pairing the devices is as simple as using a splitter. Although, your Bluetooth device may require you to follow a few simple steps.

Conclusion

There are several reasons why you might want both Bluetooth and auxiliary devices playing the same audio simultaneously. You might want to share music with others, or someone in the house prefers listening to music and shows with headphones, instead of speakers. Whatever the reason, you can do both with an aux splitter.

The ‘y’ splitter has male to female ends so you can connect and sync both devices. You canShare music with your friends or block out external noise and immerse yourself in the audio with headphones. Whatever your reason for wanting both aux and Bluetooth, you can enjoy your audio how you want.

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About Me

Hi! I’m Jonah. I grew up addicted to different electronics. I began working for an Audio/Video installation company years ago and realized my passion for Home Theaters! The Home Theater DIY is a place for me to share my different findings and experiences about home theaters and home electronics. For more information, check out my about me page!

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